The carefully crafted lyrics point to his fascination with photographic techniques and how he incorporates this into his work. The song features on Frank Ocean’s album 'Endless', also released last August.

Tillmans is exploring his musical talents further in his installation 'South Tank', from 3-12 March at Tate Modern, where he is transforming a former oil tank into an experimental space bringing together music, light, audio field recordings and his video films. It coincides with Tillman's solo exhibition, 'Wolfgang Tillmans: 2017' at the museum, 17 years after he won the Turner Prize.

Wolfgang Tillmans, 
Shit buildings going up left, right and centre 2014 
© Wolfgang Tillmans
Tillmans started making music in the 1980s. After a couple of decades of putting this interest aside in order to concentrate on photography, he began making music again a couple of years ago.

As part of 'South Tank', there is a programme of five free live events by Tillmans and other musicians, including his musical partners Tim Knapp and Jay Pluck, Lori E. Allen, Thomas Brinkmann, Othon, Throwing Shade and Wreck & Reference.

Wolfgang Tillmans, 
La Palma 2014 
© Wolfgang Tillmans
On the third floor of Tate Modern, Tillmans' exhibition assembles a wide variety of his body of work, from intimate portraits exploring homosexuality and friendship, to architecture and urbanism, still-life and nature, and abstract images made by harnessing cutting-edge technology.

At once political, emotional, sensitive and with an attention to beauty, the images form a highly personalised view of life – particularly in London, where Tillmans is based, and Germany, where is from.

Wolfgang Tillmans, 
Tukan 2010 
© Wolfgang Tillmans
Wolfgang Tillmans, 
astro crusto, a 2012 
© Wolfgang Tillmans
For the programme of 'South Tank' performances, click here.

'Wolfgang Tillmans: 2017' is at Tate Modern until 11 June 2017