Indeed, this is just one example of the culture-conflating works by the French-Moroccan artist, whose compound first name is itself a bridging of his mixed origins. Born in the seaside town of Les Sables d’Olonne in western France and now based between Brussels, Casablanca and Chicago, Lahlou, 34, interrogates stereotypes and fuses ideas of the Occident and the Oriental, Catholicism and Islam, in his multi-media practice.

Subversive yet humorous, Lahlou's pieces appropriate art history, revise it and add a personal layer of meaning. Take the sculpture, 'Equilibre aux tajines' (2012), which is composed of a white male bust of himself, in the Greek-Roman tradition, and that has three tajines used for serving Moroccan cuisine balanced on the head.

Installation views. Photo Aurélien Mole. Courtesy the artist and Rabouan Moussion Gallery
Or, equally, look at 'It’s more sexy ou Christ (Velazquez)' (2014) – an appropriation of the Vélasquez painting, 'Christ Crucified' (1632). To create his digitally-manipulated photograph, Lahlou has adorned an image of the original painting with arabesques, which are often used as a decorative motif in mosques.

Household items become twisted, too, as in the case of 'The Hourglasses' (2015), an installation of five glass containers based on egg-timers. Here, though, it isn't sand that is passing from one globule to the next, but couscous.

The Hourglasses, 2015, Blown glass and couscous, 140 x 140 x 7 cm. Courtesy the artist and Rabouan Moussion Gallery
Équilibre aux tajines, 2012, Plaster and tajines, 160 x 45 x 45 cm. Courtesy the artist and Rabouan Moussion Gallery
It’s more sexy ou Christ (Velazquez), 2014, C-print on Dibond, 68.6 x 48.3 cm. Courtesy the artist and Rabouan Moussion Gallery
Of the confused memory, 2015, Print on glass and metal, 140 x 140 x 7 cm. Courtesy the artist and Rabouan Moussion Gallery
Of the confused memory (detail), 2015, Print on glass and metal, 140 x 140 x 7 cm. Courtesy the artist and Rabouan Moussion Gallery